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Superheroes & Villains as 16th Century Paintings

Superheroes & Villains as 16th Century Paintings

Superheroes & Villains as 16th Century Paintings
Superheroes & Villains as 16th Century Paintings




Superheroes and by extensions, villains, can trace their origins as way back as 1899. But the framework of these kinds of superheroes can be placed on such folkloric characters such as Robin Hood, who sported distinctive clothing and was noted for his good deeds for the community.

Then, in 1903, The Scarlet Pimpernel was a theatrical play that further developed the archetype of superheroes and began ingraining it into the popular consciousness. This character will use a signature weapon, a disguise and will always outwit his adversaries – traits that will make the superheroes of today.

Then came Zorro in 1919, and then Popeye in 1929. The golden age of Comic Books began, and then in 1938, we have Superman and Captain Marvel one year later. Almost without a shadow of a doubt, Superman was the “mould” so to speak, on which all other superheroes have been made since him.

A different setting is almost impossible

But given the random nature of the universe and how things add up to create different outcomes, it is safe to say that the idea of superheroes, at least like the ones we are now accustomed to, would have never appeared any other time in our history. And since they haven’t, this is true. But what if they did?

What if our superheroes and villains would have appeared as back as the 16th century? How would they look like? Well, Sacha Goldberger did think this and he made some photographs to perfectly illustrate this. The project is called Super Flemish, and it’s amazing.

“A lot of the job was done before and during the shoot. Pierrick and Sebastian, my digital retouchers, helped me to get the precision and the perfection I was looking for in this series,” says Sacha. “All of it was incredible; it was like a dream come true.”

“When you see the Hulk in front of you and you, ask him to look romantic, it’s crazy. The Joker was also very impressive. He endured three hours of make-up and started to act like Heath Ledger in the movie, The Dark Knight,” adds the French photographer.