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Scandinavia To Open Its First Zero-Packaging Store This Summer

Scandinavia To Open Its First Zero-Packaging Store This Summer

Scandanavia's first zero-packaging store is set to open in Copenhagen this summer.
Scandanavia’s first zero-packaging store is set to open in Copenhagen this summer.




The world is going green, slowly but surely. Not only are some cities, such as San Francisco, banning the sale of plastic water bottles, others are opening zero-packing stores and striving to source locally-produced goods.

Doing so isn’t only beneficial for the economy, it’s helpful to the environment. According to Eurostat, 156 kg (343.9 lb) of packaging waste is generated per person each year in the European Union. In addition, the Danish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 42 kg (92.6 lb) of edible food is wasted in the region by each individual annually. Because plastic packaging and food waste are only setting humanity back, eco-entrepreneurs Frédéric Hamburger and Constance Leth decided to open LØS Market – Scandinavia’s first zero packaging supermarket.

The concept isn’t new. Germany opened a similar store last year, which actually served as inspiration for this venture. However, this store will sell over 400 organic products and source most of its food items from local producers.

FoodTank reports that customers will be able to pour liquids, such as wine, oil, and soup, into empty bottles available in the shop free of charge. In addition, the used bottles will be washed once returned by a certified washing system. They will then be available to the customers once more.

Selina Juul, the founder of Denmark’s Stop Wasting Food movement, explains:

“Research indicates that an increasing number of customers have an escalating demand for smaller food packages, as a growing part of Denmark’s and Scandinavia’s population is singles – in Denmark alone one-fifth of the population is singles.”

LØS Market is helping to solve this conundrum. Loosely translated, LØS actually means “single item,” as well as “to find a solution.” Because the Danish EPA indicates that single people throw out the most non-processed food, smaller containers and portions will help reduce food waste. If all goes to plan, the duo hopes to expand the waste-free shopping concept throughout Scandinavia in the near future.




Written by Gipsy Ninja

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Co-founder @gipsy_ninja