Ruins of an Early NYC Skyscraper Live on in an Indiana Park

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Ruins of an Early NYC Skyscraper Live on in an Indiana Park

Ruins of an Early NYC Skyscraper Live on in an Indiana Park
Ruins of an Early NYC Skyscraper Live on in an Indiana Park

The ruins of an early NYC skyscraper live on in an Indiana Park and this beautiful story simply couldn’t go away without passing it through to our readers. These ruins of a former NYC skyscraper from back in the day are now lying in Holliday Park, in the middle of Indianapolis.

The story behind these unique ruins go back to the 1890’s. 1898, to be exact. This is when a marvel of architecture, an early 26-stories tall skyscraper, was built in New York. This outstanding skyscraper was named St. Paul Building and it featured beautiful Atlantes sculptures by Karl Bitter, title ‘The Races of Man’.

Ruins of an Early NYC Skyscraper Live on in an Indiana Park
Ruins of an Early NYC Skyscraper Live on in an Indiana Park

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The statues depicted and African, a Caucasian, and an Asian standing together and holding the building on their shoulders. Karl Bitter is also known for creating parts of the facade at NYC‘s Metropolitan Museum of Art, and several other statues at Biltmore Estate in Asheville, as noted by Thought & Sight.

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Back in the 1950’s, Western Electric made plans to demolish St. Paul building. They wanted to build a bigger skyscraper located on the exactly same spot. Recognizing the artistic value of the three sculptures located at the entry, the owners of the building decided to organize a competition in order to see how and where these works of art can be reused.

Ruins of an Early NYC Skyscraper Live on in an Indiana Park

Indianapolis proposed for these 3 statues to be placed on a reproduction of the building’s facade in Holliday Park and the owners decided to allocate the artworks to this project. It took twenty years for the plans to be implemented, and none of this would have been possible without the redesigns of artist Elmer Taflinger.

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The beautiful reproduction was completed in 1973 and after a few years it fell into disrepair. Since then, a fence has been erected in order to better preserve the monument. Recent renovations have brought the ruins back into public attention and they look better than ever. Except for when they were part of the St. Paul Building, perhaps.

(Source 1, 2)