Step Inside The Mapparium, An Inside-Out Glass Globe Of The World

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Step Inside The Mapparium, An Inside-Out Glass Globe Of The World

Step Inside The Mapparium, An Inside-Out Glass Globe Of The World
BOSTON – SEPTEMBER 22: Visitors gaze at the Mapparium at The Mary Baker Eddy Library for the Betterment of Humanity in Boston, Massachusetts, on September 22, 2005. The Mapparium has not been altered since it opened in 1935, even though the many of the country names and borders shown on the Mapparium have changed since 1935. (Photo by John Nordell/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)




The Mapparium is a three-story-tall, inside-out glass globe built by Boston architect Chester Lindsay Churchill. In 1930, he was commissioned to design the new Christian Science Publishing Society headquarters and after visiting The New York Daily News building, which had a gigantic spinning globe, he decided to make an even better one. Guess what? He succeeded!

The glass globe is bisected in the middle by a glass walkway where people can go in and see how the world really looks like. Well, how the world really looked liked in 1935, that is. This is the best way to see how continents look like compared to each other, without the alterations in size and shape present on every map.

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The Mapparium hasn’t changed the borders of the countries and today, this is like a walk back in time where you will stumble across an Africa divided by European colonial powers and you will also see a lot of countries which have ceased to exist.

Another very interesting thing about the Mapparium is its acoustics. You can hear yourself in surround sound while speaking in the middle of the globe, and you can also talk with someone standing in a different part of the ‘world’ without any problem.

This is definitely a must see for all geography geeks out there, and if you are planning on visiting Boston, be sure to add the Mapparium on your list!