Step Inside Kibera, The Largest Slum In Africa

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Step Inside Kibera, The Largest Slum In Africa

Step Inside Kibera, The Largest Slum In Africa
Step Inside Kibera, The Largest Slum In Africa (Wikimedia)

Kibera is a slum located in Nairobi, Kenya’s capital city. The name ‘Kibera’ means ‘Forest’ or ‘Jungle’ in Nubian. Located 5 km (3.1 mi) away from downtown Nairobi, Kibera is the largest urban slum on the entire African continent.

In 2009, Kenya Population and Housing Census reported that 170,070 people inhabit the Kenyan slum, while other estimates show that 1, or even 2, million people call Kibera home. These huge variations in numbers are attributed to the fact that different studies have different definitions of what is considered to be Kibera. In all cases, nobody knows for sure the exact population of the slum, given that most of the people living there have no documentation.

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Kibera, Kenya. 6 July 2011 A train slows down as it passes through the slum. The Uganda Railway Line - built at the time of the British colonial rule and known locally as 'The Lunatic Express' - passes through the centre of Kibera. Shacks are tightly packed together and the railway is the main thoroughfare for the slum residents, who often walk along the rails. There is a railway station in Kibera, though trains don't stop but keep moving at a slow pace to let people hop on and off.
Kibera, Kenya. 6 July 2011
A train slows down as it passes through the slum. The Uganda Railway Line – built at the time of the British colonial rule and known locally as ‘The Lunatic Express’ – passes through the centre of Kibera. Shacks are tightly packed together and the railway is the main thoroughfare for the slum residents, who often walk along the rails. There is a railway station in Kibera, though trains don’t stop but keep moving at a slow pace to let people hop on and off.

The slum’s inhabitants earn less than $1.00 per day, making life in this Kenyan neighborhood to be one of the toughest in the world. With unemployment rates reaching sky-high limits, the people living here find it very difficult to survive and live on whatever scraps they can put together daily.

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Wikimedia

It is estimated that around 60% of the population have HIV/AIDS, as a result of frequent cases of assault and rape, which are all to common in the outskirts of Nairobi.

Few schools still function in this area and almost no one can afford a decent education.

Around 80% of the population doesn’t have access to electricity and clean water is also scarce. People live in very unsanitary conditions and open sewage systems go right through their improvised homes.

Often, children can be seen playing in toxic waste and 25% of them don’t live past the age of 5.

With more and more people living in slums, governmental actions do not seem to be enough.

Kenyan official plan on building a residential neighborhood on the entire area occupied by the slum and all of its current inhabitants will be moved inside new apartments once the constructions will be completed.

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Wikimedia
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Wikimedia