Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Contest

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Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Contest

These are the early highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest. The contest itself is in full swing and photographers have until November 17, 2017, to enter their best nature photographs. These here are some of the photos already submitted, and are some of the highlights that may be the ones that will be among the winners. But as we’ve said, there’s still one month before the contest ends.

There are four categories here: Wildlife, Landscapes, Aerials, and Underwater. The grand prize winner will receive $7,500, but will also have their work published in an upcoming issue of National Geographic magazine and on National Geographic’s Instagram account.

(Source)

Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Contest
Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Contest – “Sunrise of Maasia Mara” During month of August and September, there are millions of wild beasts, zebras, and other animals in Maasia Mara game reserve. On this September morning, a wild beast eating grass intersected the sun coming out of the horizon, creating this image. It was one of the most beautiful sunrises I had seen so far. (Photo and caption by Jay Ruan / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)

 

Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Contest
Early Highlights of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Contest – “The New Continents” An aerial view over the swamps of Cenas Tirelis near Riga, Latvia.
“Nurse shark at bimini” Bahamas, Bimini. Portrait of a nurse shark swimming in mid water. (Photo and caption by Christian Vizl/ National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“There is always room for one more” How many Mountain Goats can fit on this rock, if you start stacking them on top of each other? Mount Evans, Colorado, USA. (Photo and caption by Eivor Kuchta / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Over the lake” The picture was taken from a helicopter over lake natron. A flock of flamingos were flying over the lake. (Photo and caption by Phillip Chang / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Atlantic Puffin” An Atlantic Puffin on the remote nesting island of Machias Seal Island off the coast of Maine. (Photo and caption by Harry Collins / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Kamokuna ocean entry, November 2016” Lava flows into the ocean at sunset, Kamokuna, Kalapana, Hawaii. (Photo and caption by Grant Kaye / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Turn left!” Shot at Lake Kekini, Greece. (Photo and caption by Ruzdi Ekenheim / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Over Glacial Waters” As we flew over the beautiful Holmes River, the glacial waters contrasted nicely with the forest – the waters extra blue due to increased glacial melt. (Photo and caption by Shane Kalyn / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Smile for the camera” Heart racing, hands clenched on the handles of my camera housing, peering through the silty usually clear mangrove water. The American crocodile suddenly appeared out of the murk, almost resting its snout on the dome port of my underwater setup. I told myself to remain calm, that i was completely safe behind my camera. although it was a tense encounter at first the silty water adds to the dramatic nature of this image—a moment I will not forget in a hurry. (Photo and caption by Gary Peart / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Whale shark and anchovies” A whale shark and school of anchovies swim by at Mafia Island, Tanzania. The shark and schooling fish are often seen together as they both are after the same planktonic prey, sergestid shrimp. The population of whale sharks here is quite unique as they remain here year round, scientist believe this is because there’s an abundance of food around the island. Nowhere else in the worlds do whale sharks do this. (Photo and caption by Steve De Neef / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Kanyarunka” The Nyakamwe family of the DRC. New mom Kanyarunka shields her baby from a rambunctious toddler. (Photo and caption by Shannon Hinson-Witz / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“On the hunt” A polar bear is sniffing the air trying to sent seals. Svalbard, Norway. (Photo and caption by Daisy Gilardini / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Lightning bridge” Spectacular view of the Golden Gate Bridge during a rare Bay Area lightning and thunderstorm. (Photo and caption by Alexis Darden / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)
“Don’t come any closer” Orange Anemonefish, (Amphiprion Sandaracinos) or most commonly referred to as “Nemo” to most was shot amongst this vibrant, iridescent and highly toxic anemone. This reef habitat was situated in the pristine waters of Sipadan Island, Sabah Borneo Malaysia. (Photo and caption by Marc Hornig / National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest)