Durdle Door – The English Remnant From The Jurassic

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In 1792, during a visit at Durdle Door, the writer John O’Keefe wrote: “They persuaded me to keep on, and at last stranded me on the pebbles, exactly opposite the magnificent arch of Durdle-rock Door. Here I stood and contemplated with astonishment and pleasure this stupendous piece of Nature’s work”.

Durdle Door is indeed a true wonder of nature and one of the most photographed geographical landmarks along England’s Jurassic Coast. This immense limestone arch stretches over the sea at the eastern the end of the gulf with the same name. It was carved by the relentless waves which have battered it for thousands of years, removing the softer rock and exposing the harder Portland limestone underneath.

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These rocks ware formed some 135-195 million years ago, during the Jurassic Period, in a time when England was underneath a tropical sea. The name “Durdle Door” has been around for over one thousand years. The word “durdle” comes from the old English word “Thril” which means “to pierce” or “to drill”.

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Eventually the arch will collapse, leaving sea stacks behind similar to those that can be seen all along the South West Coast. Until then however, the arch can be visited and is only accessible on foot via a steep path and steps over the hill from Lulworth Cove. in Dorset in the name of the Lulworth Estate. It is open to the public.

 

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