Drought Makes 450-Year-Old Mexican Church To Emerge From Reservoir

158

Drought Makes 450-Year-Old Mexican Church To Emerge From Reservoir
Drought Makes 450-Year-Old Mexican Church To Emerge From Reservoir Photograph: David von Blohn/AP




Drought makes 450-year-old Mexican church to emerge from reservoir in one amazing display of nature and history, making us enjoy the beauties and wonders of Mother Earth even more.

The 450-year-old Mexican church is called the Temple of Quechula and was built in 1564. It is believed that the Spanish colonists were the ones that built it when they invaded what is now modern day Mexico.

The drought conditions that are currently challenging Chiapas, Mexico, have seen this beautiful underwater gem emerge from under the reservoir once again. The water level of the Nezahualcóyotl reservoir have dropped by 82 feet (25 meters) and made the church visible once again. Before this severe drought, the church was last seen in 1966, when it was completely flooded and covered by water.

The old Mexican church was abandoned because of the plagues of 1773 to 1776 and since then, it has been laying in ruins.

“It was a church built thinking that this could be a great population center, but it never achieved that,” says architect Carlos Navarretes. “It probably never even had a dedicated priest, only receiving visits from those from Tecpatán.” he added.

Drought Makes 450-Year-Old Mexican Church To Emerge From Reservoir
Drought Makes 450-Year-Old Mexican Church To Emerge From Reservoir Photograph: David von Blohn/AP
Drought Makes 450-Year-Old Mexican Church To Emerge From Reservoir
Drought Makes 450-Year-Old Mexican Church To Emerge From Reservoir Photograph: David von Blohn/AP

[tps_footer][/tps_footer]