The Differences Between East and West in Europe Through Maps

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The Differences Between East and West in Europe Through Maps

The Differences Between East and West in Europe Through Maps
The Differences Between East and West in Europe Through Maps




We can look at Europe as divided into two distinct parts. Its western, more developed part, and its Eastern, less developed one. The reasons for this can trace their origins way back into history. For starters, the West is far less accessible, since it has the Atlantic Ocean “watching its back”, while the East is exposed on both fronts. Moreover, since the West has access to the ocean, it gave it the opportunity to sail all around the world, and in a sense, conquer it.

But up until the Industrial Revolution starting in the second half of the 18th century, pretty much anyone around the world, with very few exceptions, were equally poor, trying to scrape a living on whatever piece of land they had at their disposal. If we were to take an ancient Roman, living around the time of Julius Caesar, and place him somewhere in rural England at the beginning of the 1700’s, with the exception of the language, he would fit right in.

But after the discovery of the steam engine and the start of the machine age, the world changed beyond recognition. But not the entire world changed at the same pace. Like ripples in a pond, the world began to evolve economically, staring from England, it’s predominantly English speaking colonies (mainly the US and Australia), western Europe and beyond. This is where the divide between the East and West truly began to take shape and look like it does today.

And then there was WWII, its aftermath, and the subsequent Iron Curtain than engulfed Eastern Europe. Isolated from the free market, the region fell behind even further. Below, we’ll be presenting you a series of maps, showing what and how the continent became as it is today; economically divided.

(Source)

This map shows when each region of the world reached, or will reach the $2,000 benchmark in terms of GDP per capita
This map shows when each region of the world reached, or will reach the $2,000 benchmark in terms of GDP per capita Source: The Age of Sustainable Development. Prof. Jeffrey Sachs

This map above makes a somewhat clear correlation between the moment each country passed passed the $2,000 GDP per capita, and the relative time they came in contact with the revolutionary new technology that would change the world forever; the steam engine.

The same map as above, but this time focusing solely on Europe.
The same map as above, but this time focusing solely on Europe.
The NATO powers in blue vs the Warsaw Pact nations in red via: Wikipedia
The NATO powers in blue vs the Warsaw Pact nations in red
via: Wikipedia
Map: Benjamin Hennig
Map: Benjamin Hennig

The colours in the map indicate the estimated population changes between 1990 (the year of unification) and 2015 (based on SEDAC population estimates). The colour shows the expected change in 2015 compared to the year 1990. This is the result of a coupling effect between internal migration to the more prosperous west, and a demographic trend towards an ageing population. Leveling the economic and demographic distribution of the country is still a huge challenge for Germany.

GermanyPopulationChangeMap-813x1024

Berlin as seen from space. While east Berlin is using sodium-vapour lamps, giving off a yellow light, west Berlin uses fluorescent lamps which all produce a white color. After more than 20 years, the difference can still be seen. Credit: Chris Hadfield
Berlin as seen from space. While east Berlin is using sodium-vapour lamps, giving off a yellow light, west Berlin uses fluorescent lamps which all produce a white color. After more than 20 years, the difference can still be seen.
Credit: Chris Hadfield
Another view from space, this time over the entire Europe. It shows how densely populated West, with Eastern Europe being mostly in densely populated cities.
Another view from space, this time over the entire Europe. It shows how densely populated West, with Eastern Europe being mostly in densely populated cities.                          Image: NASA Earth Observatory
GDP per capita in 2013 for NUTS level 2 regions, with the value for each region expressed as a percentage of the EU-28 average (set to equal 100 %). It portrays relatively ‘rich’ regions (shown in green) where GDP per capita was above the EU average and relatively ‘poor’ regions (shown in red). Credit: Eurostat
GDP per capita in 2013 for NUTS level 2 regions, with the value for each region expressed as a percentage of the EU-28 average (set to equal 100 %). It portrays relatively ‘rich’ regions (shown in green) where GDP per capita was above the EU average and relatively ‘poor’ regions (shown in red). Credit: Eurostat
Gross average wage in Euros. Image: Wikimedia
Gross average wage in Euros. Image: Wikimedia
Current Tesla Supercharger stations throughout Europe.
Current Tesla Supercharger stations throughout Europe.
Projected Tesla Supercharger network in Europe for 2016. Russia is still a no go. Image: screengrab Tesla website.
Projected Tesla Supercharger network in Europe for 2016. Russia is still a no go. Image: screengrab Tesla website.
Motorways are an essential part of any modern transport infrastructure. Without them, foreign investments are kept to a minimum and economic growth is far from maximum potential. Data: Erostat. Map: ZME Science.
Motorways are an essential part of any modern transport infrastructure. Without them, foreign investments are kept to a minimum and economic growth is far from maximum potential. Data: Erostat. Map: ZME Science.
This map shows self-reported happiness across European countries. The data was collected between 2005 and 2008, and shows the percentage of people who reported being “very happy”.
This map shows self-reported happiness across European countries. The data was collected between 2005 and 2008, and shows the percentage of people who reported being “very happy”.
Closely tied to happiness, as well as economic well-being, is fertility. Despite a world population growth rate of 1.2 per cent — according to UN data from 2010, revised in 2012 — the old Europe has become true to its name with a growing aging populace.
Closely tied to happiness, as well as economic well-being, is fertility. Despite a world population growth rate of 1.2 per cent — according to UN data from 2010, revised in 2012 — the old Europe has become true to its name with a growing aging populace.
The east has a poorer health care system than the west.
The east has a poorer health care system than the west.
The difference between the highest scoring nation (Andorra, 84.2 years) and the lowest scoring nation (Ukraine, 68 years) is over 16 whole years, or about 24% more.
The difference between the highest scoring nation (Andorra, 84.2 years) and the lowest scoring nation (Ukraine, 68 years) is over 16 whole years, or about 24% more.
Countries of Europe by perceived corruption index. Source: Europe-Forum
Countries of Europe by perceived corruption index. Source: Europe-Forum
This map is based on the data from Fraser Institute for 2012. The index is based on measures of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, individual economic choice, freedom of association, freedom of assembly, violence and crimes, freedom of movement, homosexual rights and women’s rights. Other components of the Freedom Index include human trafficking, sexual violence, female genital mutilation, homicide, freedom of movement, and adoption by homosexuals.
This map is based on the data from Fraser Institute for 2012. The index is based on measures of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, individual economic choice, freedom of association, freedom of assembly, violence and crimes, freedom of movement, homosexual rights and women’s rights. Other components of the Freedom Index include human trafficking, sexual violence, female genital mutilation, homicide, freedom of movement, and adoption by homosexuals.
This map is based on the data from DemocracyRanking.org for 2013 (situation in 2011-12), compiled by the University of Klagenfurt, Austria. Source: Eupedia.
This map is based on the data from DemocracyRanking.org for 2013 (situation in 2011-12), compiled by the University of Klagenfurt, Austria. Source: Eupedia.
map showing the percentage of the total population in primary and secondary school. You might be wondering what relevance this has at this point.
Map showing the percentage of the total population in primary and secondary school.

immigrants