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Living on the World’s Steepest Street

Living on the World’s Steepest Street

Living on the World's Steepest Street
Living on the World’s Steepest Street




Living on the world’s steepest street is completely different than living anywhere else in the world. Everyday is like a new and surprising adventure and you never know what types of people you will find walking around in your backyard. Yes, this happens pretty often.

Baldwin Street in Dunedin, a small university town in New Zealand‘s South Island is officially the world;s steepest residential road. The slope has a maximum gradient of 35% at its steepest. This gradient has a huge impact on all the residents because the street has become a worldwide tourist attraction.

Amateur athletes come to conquer Baldwin street on a regular basis, either by trying to bike all the way to the top, or by running to see just how much of the street they can cover. Locals don’t complain about the number of people coming to visit their street, they actually grew quite used to it.

Living on the World's Steepest Street
Living on the World’s Steepest Street

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Measuring 350 metres (1,150 ft) in length, Baldwin Street is also home to the annual charity event which involves 30,000 Jaffas (spherical confectionery-coated chocolate balls) being rolled down the street.

Living on the World's Steepest Street
Living on the World’s Steepest Street

The event started in 2002 and takes place every year in July. Each Jaffa chocolate ball is sponsored by one person and all the prizes and the funds raised go to charity. This event got its inspiration from a tradition started in 1998, when 2,000 tennis balls were released down Baldwin Street in order to raise money for Habitat for Humanity.