WWF Warns That All Fish Will Be Extinct By 2048

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WWF Warns That All Fish Will Be Extinct By 2048




It seems that there isn’t much else we’re hearing on the news these days other than bad news. And regardless of what reasons we’re told for all the fighting that’s going on in the world, the bottom line is that all of them are happening for the purpose of resources. We no longer can afford to ignore what’s happening around the world. The simple case of the matter is that we’re consuming far too much than we actually need, and with the growing population is inflicting a great toll on the planet and its resources.

Over the course of one year’s time, the American population is consuming somewhere around 7 million tonnes of seafood. Over the past several years, seafood as become extremely popular all over the world and has since turned into a $370 billion industry.

Up until the start of the 20th century, ocean fisheries were plentiful and virtually unaffected by human involvement. But with the implementation of newer and more efficient technologies for capturing fish, this was no longer the case. By 1950, people were capturing somewhere between 30 to 50 million tonnes of fish annually. By 1990 that number reached 90 million. However, neither of these numbers took into account the quantity of bycatch (undesired fish) which was dumped back into the ocean (dead).

As of 2014, the number of fish caught in the ocean has reached 93 million tonnes, somehow hinting towards a levelling off. But this, however, is not the case, actually showing that many fisheries around the globe have completely collapsed and there is no possible increase. Some 53% of all of the world’s fisheries are fully exploited while 32% are over-exploited or already depleted. The total amount of ocean fish consumed is somewhere around 160 million tonnes, with the difference coming from aquaculture – fish farms. These fish farms, however, are extremely damaging to the environment.

In any case, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has issued an official warning that if things won’t change for the better, the world’s oceans will completely be devoid of fish by 2048. These trends can be reversible, but only if we act now.

The biggest problem with ocean fishing, however, lies in the fact that unlike any other source of meat we have at our disposal, fishing is still seen as hunting. And so, the practice is not so tied in with supply and demand, since most fishermen overfish only to no allow others to do so. Moreover, there are illegal forms of fishing which have a devastating impact on the environment. These involve using sodium cyanide in order to stun the fish. But this substance is extremely toxic and it is estimated that every fish caught this way also causes 1 sq. meter of coral reef to die off.

There are also the insane amount of garbage in the ocean and all sorts of other pollutants which we pump into the water on a daily basis. We need to act now.